Wichita Lodge 35 Order of the Arrow

 

 
The Order of the Arrow is Scouting's National Honor Society.

Lodge Leadership:
Lodge Chief – 
Max Duhan

Lodge Advisor –  Donnie Smith

OA Wichita Lodge 35 website:  
OA Wichita Lodge 35
 

Order of the Arrow patches are usually sold at Lodge events. The Scout office has a limited amount of OA patches. Contact Scout Office for more information or to place an order.

LEC meetings are held every third Sunday of the month at 4 PM at the Scout Service Center.



Our Vision for the Order of the Arrow
As Scouting's National Honor Society, the Order of the Arrow is an integral part of the council's program. Our service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults are models of quality leadership development and programming that enrich and help to extend Scouting to America's youth.

For more than 90 years, their peers have honored those Scouts who "best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives" with membership in the Order of the Arrow. This recognition provides encouragement for others to live these ideals as well. We will provide ways and means for OA members to do more to assist their units and councils, and help them succeed in doing so.

In support of our vision as Scouting's National Honor Society and an integral part of every council, the Order of the Arrow will further increase its service to Scouting.

Purpose
The purpose of the Order of the Arrow is fourfold:
  • To recognize those Scout campers who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives and by such recognition cause other campers to conduct themselves in such a manner as to warrant recognition
  • To develop and maintain camping traditions and spirit
  • To promote Scout camping, which reaches its greatest effectiveness as a part of the unit's camping program, both year-round and in the summer camp, as directed by the local council's camping committee
  • To crystallize the Scout habit of helpfulness into a life purpose of leadership in cheerful service to others

History
The Order of the Arrow was founded by Dr. E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson in 1915 at the Treasure Island Camp of the BSA's Philadelphia Council. It became an official program experiment in 1922 and was approved as part of the Scouting program in 1934. In 1948, the OA, recognized as the BSA's national brotherhood of honor campers, became an official part of the Boy Scouts of America.

In 1998, the Order of the Arrow was recognized as Scouting's National Honor Society when it expanded its reach beyond camping to include a greater focus on leadership development, membership extension, adventurous programming, and broader service to Scouting and the community. Today, its service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults are models of quality leadership development and programming that enrich, support, and help extend Scouting to America's youth.

Membership
The OA has more than 180,000 members located in lodges affiliated with more than 300 BSA local councils.

Eligibility
To become a member, a youth must be a registered member of a Boy Scout troop or Varsity Scout team and hold First Class rank. The youth must have experienced 15 days and nights of Boy Scout camping during the two-year period prior to the election. The 15 days and nights must include one, but no more than one, long-term camp consisting of six consecutive days and five nights of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America. The balance of the camping must be overnight, weekend, or other short-term camps. Following approval by the Scoutmaster or Varsity team Coach, Scouts are elected to seek membership in the Order by their fellow unit members. Then, after completing an Ordeal experience, they become members of the Order of the Arrow.

Adult selection is based on the ability to perform the necessary functions to help the Order fulfill its purpose, and is not for recognition. Selected adult Scouters must be an asset to the Order because of demonstrated abilities and provide a positive role model for the youth members of the lodge.

Induction
The induction process, called the Ordeal, is the first step toward full membership in the Order. During the experience, candidates maintain silence, work on camp improvement projects, and sleep apart from other campers. The candidate is expected to use this time to strengthen his involvement in the unit and encourage Scout camping.

Brotherhood Membership
After 10 months of service as an Ordeal member and after fulfilling certain requirements, a member may take part in the Brotherhood ceremony, which places further emphasis on the ideals of Scouting and the Order. Completion of this ceremony signifies full membership in the Order.

Vigil Honor
After two years of service as a Brotherhood member, and with the approval of the National Order of the Arrow Committee, a Scout or Scouter may be recognized with the Vigil Honor for outstanding service to Scouting, his lodge, and the community. This honor is bestowed by special selection and is limited to one person for every 50 members registered with the lodge each year.

Lodges
Each local Boy Scout council is encouraged to have an Order of the Arrow lodge. The OA lodge helps the local council provide a quality Scouting program through recognition of Scouting spirit and performance, development of youth leadership and service, promotion of Scout camping and outdoor programs, and enhancement of membership tenure.



As Scouting's National Honor Society, the Order of the Arrow is an integral part of the council's program. Our service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults are models of quality leadership development and programming that enrich and help to extend Scouting to America's youth.For more than 90 years, their peers have honored those Scouts who "best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives" with membership in the Order of the Arrow. This recognition provides encouragement for others to live these ideals as well. We will provide ways and means for OA members to do more to assist their units and councils, and help them succeed in doing so.In support of our vision as Scouting's National Honor Society and an integral part of every council, the Order of the Arrow will further increase its service to Scouting.The purpose of the Order of the Arrow is fourfold:The Order of the Arrow was founded by Dr. E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson in 1915 at the Treasure Island Camp of the BSA's Philadelphia Council. It became an official program experiment in 1922 and was approved as part of the Scouting program in 1934. In 1948, the OA, recognized as the BSA's national brotherhood of honor campers, became an official part of the Boy Scouts of America.In 1998, the Order of the Arrow was recognized as Scouting's National Honor Society when it expanded its reach beyond camping to include a greater focus on leadership development, membership extension, adventurous programming, and broader service to Scouting and the community. Today, its service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults are models of quality leadership development and programming that enrich, support, and help extend Scouting to America's youth.The OA has more than 180,000 members located in lodges affiliated with more than 300 BSA local councils.To become a member, a youth must be a registered member of a Boy Scout troop or Varsity Scout team and hold First Class rank. The youth must have experienced 15 days and nights of Boy Scout camping during the two-year period prior to the election. The 15 days and nights must include one, but no more than one, long-term camp consisting of six consecutive days and five nights of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America. The balance of the camping must be overnight, weekend, or other short-term camps. Following approval by the Scoutmaster or Varsity team Coach, Scouts are elected to seek membership in the Order by their fellow unit members. Then, after completing an Ordeal experience, they become members of the Order of the Arrow.Adult selection is based on the ability to perform the necessary functions to help the Order fulfill its purpose, and is not for recognition. Selected adult Scouters must be an asset to the Order because of demonstrated abilities and provide a positive role model for the youth members of the lodge. The induction process, called the Ordeal, is the first step toward full membership in the Order. During the experience, candidates maintain silence, work on camp improvement projects, and sleep apart from other campers. The candidate is expected to use this time to strengthen his involvement in the unit and encourage Scout camping.After 10 months of service as an Ordeal member and after fulfilling certain requirements, a member may take part in the Brotherhood ceremony, which places further emphasis on the ideals of Scouting and the Order. Completion of this ceremony signifies full membership in the Order. After two years of service as a Brotherhood member, and with the approval of the National Order of the Arrow Committee, a Scout or Scouter may be recognized with the Vigil Honor for outstanding service to Scouting, his lodge, and the community. This honor is bestowed by special selection and is limited to one person for every 50 members registered with the lodge each year.Each local Boy Scout council is encouraged to have an Order of the Arrow lodge. The OA lodge helps the local council provide a quality Scouting program through recognition of Scouting spirit and performance, development of youth leadership and service, promotion of Scout camping and outdoor programs, and enhancement of membership tenure.